Current 2014
Panels and Events

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Monthly Panel Series presented in association with

Announcing the next TRU monthly panel

Tuesday July 22nd, 7:30pm
(originally planned for Wednesday the 23rd - note date change)

Music Licensing vs Musical Licensing:
Acquiring Rights and Avoiding Wrongs.

With Michael Barra, President, Stageworks Media (former executive at Walt Disney Pictures and Disney Theatrical Group as well as with Daryl Roth Theatrical Licensing); Sean Patrick Flahaven, Senior Vice President of Theatre and Catalog Development for Warner/Chappell Music; Bruce J. Lazarus, Executive Director of Samuel French; Miriam Stern, attorney; Fred Stuart, Director of Marketing Theatrical Rights Worldwide; others tba.

We'll explore the dramatic differences between acquiring rights for existing music to use in theatrical works, including jukebox musicals, and extending the life of original musical theater works through a very different kind of "licensing." We'll also talk about licensing product from one media to another, and address other questions that attendees may have.

Doors open at 7:00pm for networking and refreshments, roundtable introductions of everyone in the room will start at 7:30pm - come prepared with your best one-minute summary of who you are, and what you need. Free for TRU members; $12 for non-members. Please call at least a day in advance (or much sooner) for reservations: 212/714-7628; or e-mail TRUStaff1@gmail.com

The Players Theater, 115 Macdougal Street, 3rd floor Loft Theatre



RECENT MEETINGS/EVENTS

Wednesday June 25th, 7:30pm
You Oughta Be in Pictures?
Making the Switch from Theater to Film.

With Michael Alden, producer (theater: Grey Gardens, Bat Boy, The King's Speech on stage, Becoming Dr. Ruth; film: Just Cause with Sean Connery, documentary UnZipped, Academy Award nominee The Hours, multi-award winning Kissing Jessica Stein, foreign feature film The Zookeeper starring Sam Neill); Sam Adelman, producer/editor (film: Screen Door Jesus, Welcome to Academia, documentaries That Daughter's Crazy, Oscar); Daryl Sledge, producer (Fried Chicken and Latkes), film productions (I Am Legend, Salt, Previous), production assistant NBC Universal, producer in RipFest; others tba.

This panel will help you determine if the skills you bring to producing in theater translate into film and television.  We will explore the similarities and differences, the comparative costs of producing each, the differences in how you should approach investors, and how to identify if a property is adaptable from one medium to another.

Doors open at 7:00pm for networking and refreshments, roundtable introductions of everyone in the room will start at 7:30pm - come prepared with your best one-minute summary of who you are, and what you need. Free for TRU members; $12 for non-members. Please call at least a day in advance (or much sooner) for reservations: 212/714-7628; or e-mail TRUStaff1@gmail.com

Wednesday April 30th, 7:30pm
Nurturing New Works:
What Producers Can Learn from the O'Neill's National Playwrights Conference.

With Jeffrey Sweet, playwright (The Value of Names, Kunstler, Flyovers, Bluff, Court-Martial at Fort Devens, You Only Shoot the Ones You Love) and the upcoming book "The O'Neill: The Transformation of Modern American Theater" on the 50th anniversary of the Eugene O'Neill Theater Center; Tom Viertel, Board Chairman of the O'Neill Center, commercial producer (Hairspray, The Producers, A Little Night Music, Young Frankenstein, Leap of Faith, The Norman Conquests, Gypsy, Sweeney Todd, Company, Little Shop of Horrors, The Weir, The Sound of Music, Smokey Joe’s Café, Angels in America, Oleanna, Love Letters, Driving Miss Daisy, Frankie and Johnny in the Clair de Lune, Penn and Teller and many others); Linda Winer, chief theater critic and arts columnist for Newsday, frequent teacher at the National Critics Institute of the O'Neill.

For nearly 50 years, the Eugene O’Neill Theater Center has been a pioneer in the development of new work and new artists for American theater. The National Playwrights Conference, and subsequently the National Music Theater Conference, were founded upon the concept that critically important work exists between (1) when a work is written and (2) when it advances into production. That step became known as “the O’Neill process.” How has this process evolved over the years, how has it set the pattern for other developmental programs, and how does it influence the way writers develop their work? What do writers learn at the O'Neill? Might it be fruitful for commercial producers to apply some of the principles of the O'Neill when developing new works for production?

The Players Theater, 115 Macdougal Street, downstairs Mainstage Theatre


Wednesday March 19th, 7:30pm
The Commercial/Not-for-Profit Collaboration:
The New Normal?

With Andrus Nichols, producing director of Bedlam Theatre; Patrick Blake, producer (Bedlam Theatre's Hamlet/St. Joan, In the Continuum, The Exonerated, Play Dead); Andrew Leynse, artistic director Primary Stages; David Elliott, co-director of Perry Street Theatricals (Bedlam Theatre's St. Joan/Hamlet, Vanya & Sonia & Masha & Spike, In the Continuum, An Oak Tree).

As expenses in commercial theater have soared, the development of new work has grown increasingly dependent on strategic partnerships with not-for-profit and regional theaters. We'll look at the process involved in making an appropriate match, what stage in development a commercial theater might want to find a not-for-profit partner (and vice versa), as well as discuss the intricacies of enhancement deals. For the most part these arrangements can be seen as win-win, but there are cautions that need to be considered.

The Players Theater, 115 Macdougal Street, downstairs Mainstage Theatre


Wednesday February 19th, 7:30pm
Artistic Director vs. Commercial Producer:
The Blurred Line Between Art and Commerce

With Patrick Blake, producer (Bedlam Theatre's Hamlet/St. Joan, In the Continuun, The Exonerated, Play Dead); Hamilton Clancy, artistic director of the Drilling Company; Bill Franzblau, commercial producer (Tony® Award nominee for Say Goodnight Gracie, American Buffalo revival, Wonderland; off-Broadway: Evil Dead the Musical, Jewtopia, Sistas the Musical, iluminate; on tour: Little House on the Prairie); Martin Platt, co-director of Perry Street Theatricals (Bedlam Theatre's St. Joan/Hamlet, Vanya & Sonia & Masha & Spike, In the Continuum, An Oak Tree), founding artistic director of Alabama Shakespeare Festival, former artistic director of New Mexico Repertory; Cara Reichel, producing artistic director Prospect Theater Company.

Artistic directors tend to be well-respected leaders of companies who are perceived to do "important" work, while commercial producers are often viewed with distrust. The former even have "artist" in its job title, while the latter are seemingly besmirched by the idea of "commercialism." Yet both have the same goal: to bring to the stage works that they whole-heartedly believe in and that will please and serve their audiences. And while one answers to a board of directors and the other to investors, both are generally the guiding vision behind a body of work, and both must balance artistic and commericial concerns. So why choose one world over the other? And is it possible to work successfully in both?

The Players Theater, 115 Macdougal Street, downstairs Mainstage Theatre


Wednesday January 22nd, 7:30pm
Your Festival Show:
Getting It In, Getting It On, Getting It Seen!


With Mary Kate Burke, director of programming and Matt Britten, director of marketing New York Musical Theatre Festival (NYMF); Jillian Carucci, co-producing artistic director Planet Connections Theatre Festivity; John Chatterton, executive producer Midtown International Theatre Festival; Nancy Holson of the new J-Fest, launching this spring; Elena Holy, producing artistic director Fringe NYC; Peter Michael Marino, participant in the Edinburgh, Adelaide, Brighton & Hollywood Fringes; Carol Polcovar, artistic director Fresh Fruit Festival.

The summer festival scene is a hotbed of opportunity for the development of new work. Which festivals provide the best environment for your production? How do you submit, and what are some of the secrets to giving your submission a competitive edge? Once accepted, what is expected of you? More importantly, what you can reasonably expect from a festival showcase? And how do you distinguish yourself in the marketplace so that once you build it, they really will come?

Doors open at 7:00pm for networking and refreshments, roundtable introductions of everyone in the room will start at 7:30pm - come prepared with your best one-minute summary of who you are, and what you need. Free for TRU members; $12 for non-members. Please call at least a day in advance (or much sooner) for reservations: 212/714-7628; or e-mail TRUStaff1@gmail.com

The Players Theater, 115 Macdougal Street, 3rd floor Loft Theatre


Wednesday December 18th, 7:30pm
The Bumpy Road to New York:

Developmental Paths for New Works


With producer Van Dean of The Broadway Consortium (Tony® Award winning producer of The Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess with 4 other Tony® Award nominations for the revivals of Evita, Gore Vidal’s The Best Man, Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Cinderella and Catch Me If You Can; also Matilda, Big Fish, Bonnie & Clyde, Chinglish, Rooms: a rock romance; Grammy nominee for Matilda recording) and general partner on an incoming Broadway show; producer Larry Kaye of Hop Theatricals (revival of Mamet’s Oleanna, the Tony Award winning American Idiot, Tony Award winning revival of Blithe Spirit, off-Broadway's Rooms: a rock romance) and general partner on an incoming Broadway show; producer Jana Robbins (Little Women, Ragtime revival, Through the Night) who has been working with writer D. Tucker Smith to bring in Smith’s play Roof of the World (formerly The Great Game); and Ken Waissman (the original Grease, Agnes of God, Torch Song Trilogy) who is working on bringing in Josephine, a musical about legendary Josephine Baker.

It's not easy getting a show to New York, and there's no one way to do it. We'll look at various developmental trajectories, including regional productions, not-for-profit partnerships, college collaborations and testing the waters in the West End, as well as the early steps from table readings to industry presentations. We will also talk about the producer’s role as a creative collaborator, options and other ways a producer can be attached to a project, the pros and cons of having a producer come on board during early development and the reasonable expectations a writer and producer may have of each other during the road to production.

Doors open at 7:00pm for networking and refreshments, roundtable introductions of everyone in the room will start at 7:30pm - come prepared with your best one-minute summary of who you are, and what you need. Free for TRU members; $12 for non-members. Please call at least a day in advance (or much sooner) for reservations: 212/714-7628; or e-mail TRUStaff1@gmail.com

We're back at The Players Theater, 115 Macdougal Street


Tuesday November 19th, 7:30pm
Negotiation, Collaboration, Mediation:
Minimizing the Off-Stage Drama

With attorney/producer Ben Feldman of Beigelman, Feiner & Feldman, attorney and mediator Eric S. Goldman, attorney Mitchell Epner of Wilk Auslander; plus commercial producers tba.

What producers and all theater artists need to know to prevent problems, as well as solve problems. All three of these areas - negotiation, collaboration and mediation - ultimately impact each other and need to be addressed and understood in order for a production to run smoothly. Basic contracts will also be touched upon.

Doors open at 7:00pm for networking and refreshments, roundtable introductions of everyone in the room will start at 7:30pm - come prepared with your best one-minute summary of who you are, and what you need. Free for TRU members and members of LIT (League of Independent Theater); $12 for non-members. Please call at least a day in advance (or much sooner) for reservations: 212/714-7628; or e-mail TRUnltd@aol.com

The Playroom Theater, 151 W. 46th Street, 8th floor


Tuesday October 22nd, 7:30pm
Marketing for Indie Theater:
Banding Together for a Stronger Presence

An open forum to discuss existing marketing strategies, and which ones work and why, and ways in which Indie Theater can use them to reach out to a larger audience base. Cooperative marketing ventures will be considered, as well as effective uses of social media. Guests will include Dan Bianchi of Radiotheatre, John Clancy of League of Independent Theatre, Cecily Benjamin Hughes of AM1600 WWRL Radio, Emily Owens of Emily Owens PR, Paul Siebold of Off Off PR, Jonathan Slaff of Jonathan Slaff Theatrical Public Relations, Calvin Wynter of Inbrook general management & producing, Erez Ziv of Horse Trade, and others.

Doors open at 7:00pm for networking and refreshments, roundtable intorductions of everyone in the room will start at 7:30pm - come prepared with your best one-minute summary of who you are, and what you need. Free for TRU members and members of LIT (League of Independent Theater); $12 for non-members. Please call at least a day in advance (or much sooner) for reservations: 212/714-7628; or e-mail TRUnltd@aol.com

The Playroom Theater, 151 W. 46th Street, 8th floor


Tuesday September 17th, 7:30pm
An Introduction to TRU:
Free-for-Everyone Seasonal Kick-off plus Networking Meet-and-Greet


Photo by Studio 7/Junenoire Mitchell

With TRU board members and program directors: producers Michael Alden (Becoming Dr. Ruth, Grey Gardens, Sarah Jones’ Bridge & Tunnel, Bat Boy the musical, The King’s Speech onstage; plus movies including Kissing Jessica Stein and The Hours) and Patrick Blake (The Exonerated, In the Continuum, Play Dead) who serve on the TRU Board as well as run the Producer Development & Mentorship Program; Board member and financial advisor Bailie Slevin who will announce the formation of the TRU Young Patrons Board; advisory board member, producer Ken Waissman (Grease, Torch Song Trilogy, Agnes of God) will talk about our Director-Writer Communications Lab; Cate Cammarata, TRU’s Literary Manager; Diana Amsterdam, instructor for TRU’s Practical Playwriting workshop; Gillien Goll, one of the TRU coaches for the Writer-Producer Speed Date; and staff administrator Patrick Goss, who will review programs for actors including the annual Audition Event.

Here'a chance for all of our new friends - and old friends as well - to come and learn more about what we do here at Theater Resources Unlimited, how we've expanded and what's coming up next. It's also a chance for you to tell us about yourself and what you need to learn this coming year, as well as network away. Meet some of our prominent board members, hear about our upcoming programs. Most of all, socialize with like-minded professionals in a supportive environment, with refreshments and wine. Yes, we said wine - but wait until AFTER you've introduced yourself to the room!

Doors open at 7:00pm for networking and refreshments, roundtable intorductions of everyone in the room will start at 7:30pm - come prepared with your best one-minute summary of who you are, and what you need. FREE for everyone; note that future meetings will be $12 for non-members. Please call at least a day in advance (or much sooner) for reservations: 212/714-7628; or e-mail TRUnltd@aol.com


Tuesday July 16th, 7:30pm
Reinventing Off-Broadway for a New Audience:
Site Specific, Inter-active and Immersive Theater

Immersive theater

With Ryan Bogner, Director of Creative Development and Production for RKO, Producer of the upcoming The Orion Experience; Rachel Chavkin, director of Natasha and Pierre and the Great Comet of 1812;; Stephanie Ybarra, artistic associate at The Public Theater (Here Lies Love) ; Stephen Squibb of Woodshed Collective (The Tenant at the West Park Presbyterian Church & Parish House, Herman Melville's The Confidence Man on a decommissioned Coast Guard ship, 12 Ophelias in McCarren Park pool); and Ana Margineanu & Molly Morris of PopUP Theatrics (site-specific/site impacting theatrical events in collaborations with theater artists worldwide).

With the economics of off-Broadway making it increasingly difficult for productions to break even, producers are now searching for models that can infuse fresh life into theater beyond the branded Broadway fare. In an effort to attract new and younger audiences, there is a great deal of experimentation with hybrid theatrical experiences that blend in elements of club-going, livestreaming or even texting and other now-normal forms of inter-activity. This panel will explore the recent success of site-specific, interactive and immersive theater experiences, including current successes as well as less high-profile works from smaller companies.  What are the logistics of producing these types of productions/ What are the challenges of using non-traditional spaces? And most important of all, how do you reach young audiences with these new models?

Doors open at 7:00pm for networking and refreshments, panel starts promptly at 7:30pm. FREE for TRU members; $12 for non-members. Please call at least a day in advance (or much sooner) for reservations: 212/714-7628; or e-mail TRUnltd@aol.com

The Players Theatre, 115 Macdougal Street


Tuesday May 21st, 7:30pm
How to Be a Singular Sensation:
What Makes a Successful Solo Show?

With (left to right) Kevin Bailey, producer/general manager, co-founder MB Artists (executive producer of Ann with Holland Taylor, produced and represented Jaston Williams, Joe Sears and Ed Howard and the four highly successful plays in the Greater Tuna cycle); Michael Alden, producer (Sarah Jones' Bridge & Tunnel, Spalding Grey Stories Left to Tell, The King's Speech on stage, Grey Gardens, Bat Boy); Matt Hoverman, writer (The Audience, In Transit, Who You See Here), actor and teacher of “Create Your Own Solo Show” workshops (helped create winners of the 2005, 2009, 2010 & 2012 FringeNYC Best Solo Show Awards)); Paul Lucas, producer/general manager/international touring booker (Obie Award winner Taylor Mac, Lortel winner Iris Bahr's Dai (Enough), Obie winner David Drake's Son of Drakula, A Conversation with Edith Head); Josh Rivedal, writer-performer-producer (The Gospel According to Josh).

Solo shows are notoriously hard to market in commercial theater, but some have managed to break through. How do you know if your solo performance piece has commercial potential? What are the elements of a solo show that move it beyond the very personal vision of a single artist to something with broad, possibly Universal appeal? If one of the essential elements of "theater" is the interaction of characters, how do you create relationships with only one person on stage? Not all works belong in a commercial environment. What are other markets that can sustain the life of a one-person show, and how does one define success in this specialized world?

Doors open at 7:00pm for networking and refreshments, panel starts promptly at 7:30pm. FREE for TRU members; $12 for non-members. Please call at least a day in advance (or much sooner) for reservations: 212/714-7628; or e-mail TRUnltd@aol.com

The Players Theatre, 115 Macdougal Street


Tuesday April 23rd, 7:30pm
Above, left to right: Jeffrey Chrzczon, producer, general manager and company manager (Mike Tyson: Undisputed Truth directed by Spike Lee, The Lyons, Kathy Griffin Wants a Tony, Saturday Night Fever, Jekyll & Hyde); Tiffani Gavin, producer/general manager, formerly with American Repertory Theater, Theatrical Rights Worldwide; Erach Screwvala, entertainment attorney; Michael Barra, VP licensing & business development for Daryl Roth Theatrical Licensing; Darnetha Lincoln M'Baye, owner of Ibis Eye Consulting, former VP at EMI Music Publishing; Dorothy Marcic, writer (Respect: A Musical Journey of Women, Sistas); TRU president Bob Ost. All photos by Junenoire Mitchell, Studio 7.

"Licensing" is a word that is used a lot in both the music and theater worlds, but it means different things in different contexts. Consider the dramatic difference between licensing a show and optioning a work for production. When it is part of subsidiary rights, licensing extends the life of a show, potentially benefitting both writers and producers. And then there are the costs, pluses and minuses of licensing music: is a "jukebox musical" easier to produce than a show with an original score? We'll look at dramatic and grand rights, performance rights and other permutations to consider when incorporating music into a presentation, as well as the ins and outs of licensing still and video images for production and marketing purposes.

The Players Theatre, 115 Macdougal Street


Tuesday March 19, 7:30pm
New Trends in Marketing for Theater:
How to Use Them. And Understand Them.

Digital Marketing Panel

Above left to right: Damian Bazadona, President of Situation Interactive; Kate Koch, Senior Broadway Account Executive at Theatermania; Bill Hofstetter, Hofstetter + Partners/Agency212; TRU's Bob Ost.

What exactly IS digital marketing? How do you use it, and how do you read those complex backend reports you can get? What other new trends are helping theater keep pace in a difficult economy? And what do other industries do that theater could learn from?

The Players Theatre, 115 Macdougal Street,


Tuesday February 19th, 7:30pm
Singing a New Tune:
Let's Revitalize the Musical Theater Development Process
!

Above, left to right: Eric Goldman, entertainment attorney; Joe Calarco, director/adaptor (Shakespeare's R&J, director Sarah Plain and Tall, In Transit), co-artistic director Breaking Bread Theatre Company; Jamibeth Margolis, artistic director of musicals for Midtown International Theatre Festival; Frank Ventura, producing artistic director of CAP 21; Eliza Venture, artistic director of CAP 21; John Chatteron, producing artistic diurector Midtown Internationasl Theatre Festival; Tiffani Gavin, producer/general manager, formerly with American Repertory Theater (Porgy & Bess), Theatrical Rights Worldwide, Martian Entertainment; TRU president Bob Ost.

To many, the American musical theatre industry appears to be in crisis, as there are very few original works from new authors being developed. We are seeing a lot of movies being turned into musicals, and we’re seeing production budgets skyrocket. New voices and "less commercial" properties are simply being squeezed out of the market. So how do we revitalize the musical theater development process? Should we place a greater value on the development work that theatres do – the Labs, the Showcases? To start to view those presentations as being a valuable element in the development of new works, and to ask producers and writers who benefit from that developmental process to contribute to the development of future works from new writers by committing a small portion of income from successfully developed works?

The Players Theatre, 115 Macdougal Street,


Tuesday January 22nd, 7:30pm (networking at 7pm)
Projecting the Future:
When and How to Use New Theater Technology


Bove, left to right: Lorca Peress, artistic director Multistages multidisciplinary, multi-cultural theatre (The Island of No Tomorrows, Temple of the Souls); Jan Hartley, projection designer (Wagner's Ring Cycle at San Francisco opera, My Kinsman for Bruce Saylor Opera Queens College, The Island of No Tomorrows and Hell and High Water for MultiStages); Stafford Arima, director (Bare the Musical, Carrie revival featuring Marin Mazzie, The Tin Pan Alley Rag, Altar Boyz, The Secret Garden featuring Laura Benanti, Steven Pasquale, Celia Keenan-Bolger & Will Chase, My Mother's Lesbian Jewish Wiccan Wedding, Allegiance); Sven Ortel, projection designer (Broadway: Jumpers, Faith Healer, Deuce, The Little Mermaid, Woman On The Verge Of A Nervous Breakdown, Wonderland and Newsies; off-Broadway: Carrie revival); TRU president Bob Ost; Karen Eterovich, self-producing actor (Cheer from Chawton, Love Arm'd); Richard DiBella, production and video designer (Broadway: The Performers; Off-Broadway: Silence! The Musical, Forever Dusty: The Dusty Springfield Musical, Now. Here. This.);

Many producers think that projections are a cost-effective substitute for a set design, but that may not always be the case. Projections can be expensive, and may not work equally well in all venues. And they often are better used as an enhancement to a set, rather than a subsititute, so two designers may be needed, as well as a lighting designer who can work well with both. The use of video, projections and other technology as part of a production should be a carefully considered artistic decision as well as a budgetary one. When does technology enhance and support a concept, and when does it become intrusive or distracting? Should more directors consider technology when they develop a visual approach to a piece, and should more producers plan for it in their budgets? How do a director, set designer, lighting designer and projection designer work together and maintain artristic integrity to create a unified production concept? What advances have been made in recent years to make technology more effective?

The Players Theatre, 115 Macdougal Street, 3rd floor Loft


Tuesday November 27th, 7:30pm (networking at 7pm)
So Where's the Money and How Do I Get Some?
Funding Strategies for Indie and Not-for-Profit Producers


Above, left to right: Andrew Frank, former Director of the Cultural Institutions Unit at the NY Department of Cultural Affairs, founding Artistic Director of Manhattan Theatresource; Gigi Bolt, theater and musical theatre program and philanthropy consultant, former Interim Executive Director of Theatre Communications Group, Director of Theater and Musical Theater at the National Endowment for the Arts, Director of the Theater Program at the New York State Council on the Arts;Stacey McMath, arts program specialist for NY Department of Cultural Affairs.

Navigating the City: are you eligible for DCA and City Council money, and how do you go about applying? What are funders looking for, and how do you convince them you have it? ... Individual Givers: finding them and cultivating them through cultivation events and other strategies.... Now that we're well into the 21st century, how important are crowdsourcing sites like Kickstarter, Indiegogo and Rockethub? Is one better than the others? How do you fit them into an overall fundraising strategy? How do you maximize your online impact? ... How do you get the attention of private foundations? How do you find them? Which ones are open to unsolicited proposals? And are there really corporations still out there?

The Players Theatre, 115 Macdougal Street - Mainstage Theatre, 1st floor

Wednesday October 17th, 7:30pm (networking at 7pm)
Two Sides to the Producing Story:
Commercial versus Not-for-Profit. (Which Side Are YOU On?)


Above, left to right: Lou Moreno, artistic director of INTAR Theatre; James Morgan, artistic director of the York Theatre Company (Closer Than Ever, Enter Laughing); Cheryl Wiesenfeld, commercial producer (The Gershwin's Porgy & Bess, Elaine Stritch: At Liberty, The Exonerated, In the Continuum, Legally Blonde, A Steady Rain); David Elliott, co-director of Perry Street Theatricals (The Exonerated, In the Continuum, Obie Award winning An Oak Tree); Patrick Blake, commercial producer (The Exonerated, In the Continuum, Play Dead); TRU presideent Bob Ost.
ALL PHOTOS BY PAUL GRECO.

Are there different skill sets that separate the successful commercial producer from the artistic director of a not-for-profit theater company? Do they speak different languages, have different goals, approach their work in a different way? Or do they have more in common than it might appear? What does it take to be successful in each? And why does someone choose one area over the other in their career? More and more commercial producers and not-for-profit theaters are partnering. If this is indeed the new normal, then it may be more important than ever for the players to understand both sides of producing.

The Players Theatre, 115 Macdougal Street, Mainstage


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